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SUPERVILLA

Supervilla

Economy exhibiting at Spectrum Project Space. Opening on May 29 2012, Edith Cowan University 2 Bradford Street Mount Lawley Perth.

SUPERVILLA documentation

Western Australia and Perth are mutating at break neck speed. The current mining boom have a profound impact on the landscape, both directly by the sheer masses dug out of the ground, but also indirectly due the creation of wealth and its effect on the urban landscape. These changes are manifested in high profile projects like the remodelling of the foreshore of Perth’s city centre, the new stadium, the new entertainment centre and the planned facelifts of Cottesloe, Scarborough and City Beach, but more importantly it is evident in the subdivisions in existing suburbs and the massive rolling out of cul-de-sac developments to the north and south. We now see a transformation that will have an enormous influence on the infrastructure of the city and the everyday life of the hundreds of thousands living here .

Paradoxically by trying to maintain and continue a way of life, the single family-double garage-backyard standard, it has become so distorted that it is no longer recognisable. The increase in economic wealth is being used, not to build communities but to cover up the fact that they do not exist. With the displacement of work and wealth, ever-increasing privatization and degradation of public space, Perth can be read as our global contemporary condition on steroids. With this project we are trying to address some of the conditions we see as specific to Perth. It is to be understood not as an overview, trying to see the big picture or going for broad generalisations. Instead we are trying to position this work between the mechanics of the ongoing economic upswing and its effects on particular situations, articulating an understanding of architectural contexts.

Tracing and transforming histories, narratives of place, particular activities and phenomena becomes a way of understanding difference. As a way of producing resistance, instead of the well-behaved approach to what is considered urgent, we are engaging ourselves in the degree zero of contemporary general culture. We are going for post-hippie, drop city kind of proposals, a housing project for sixteen hundred family members, less suburbia and more Thunderdome, one thousand shades of beige, the involuntary street-side architecture of mortgage and lattice choreographies.